Tag Archives: B&W

Lee Jeffries

Please take a look at the work of Lee Jeffries from Manchester, UK. We here at Connective Collective headquarters were blown away when we first discovered these stunning portraits, we think you will be too.
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all photos ©Lee Jeffries

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J A Mortram

Check out these fantastic black & white portraits from UK based photographer JA Mortram.  You can find much more from him here and here

©J A Mortram

photo of the day!

hiya folks. today’s photo of the day comes from Donnie Vendetta out of Madison, Wisconsin. More of Donnie’s photos can be found here and you can dig some of his music here.


©Donnie Vendetta

introducing Jeff Phillips!

Jeff grew up in the southwest United States, he lived in St. Lous for a while before moving to Chicago in 2000.  Jeff has been making pictures for more than twenty-five years, he worked in commercial photography for over a decade during the 80’s and 90’s before realizing that making pictures for other people wasn’t satisfying and moved on.  Since then Jeff has been concentrating on a variety of projects, the most recent being Crowdspotting, a series shot with a swing-lens panoramic camera in the streets of Chicago.  You can see more of these images here

I asked Jeff how he makes these incredible cinematic images, here’s what he said:

I use a manual film camera for this work. It’s super weird–the lens swings on a vertical axis, using a motor, and exposing the film through a small slit in a drum, making a long and skinny image on the film.  I process the exposed film in my kitchen sink and hang it to to dry in my bathroom shower.  I’d print them in a darkroom if I had the space, but I don’t.  So, I digitize the negatives using a high-resolution film scanner, and then tweak the images in Photoshop.  I don’t crop, I don’t clone, I don’t colorize.  Everything is as pure as I can keep it – these are “street” photographs and I am trying to stay true to the traditions.   Lastly, I print the photographs up to six feet wide on a wide-format photographic inkjet printer that takes up a good portion of my living room.

Take a peek…

all photos ©Jeff Phillips